The Conquest of Happiness – Bertrand Russell

“The secret of happiness is this: let your interests be as wide as possible, and let your reactions to the things and persons that interest you be as far as possible friendly rather than hostile.”

The first thought that came to my mind while reading this book is that although this book is generally classified as philosophy, I find it equally suitable to be clubbed under self-help. Well, in a way, all philosophy is a form of self-help. And this book veers more into that territory than other philosophy literature. Now depending on where you stand with regard to the self-help genre, you may like or hate this book. But what I liked is that most of the concepts proposed in this book are clear, succinct and as relevant today as they were during the author’s time. And this book can be a good introduction to some of Bertrand Russell’s other works as well.

The Conquest of Happiness is divided into two parts. The first part deals with the various causes of unhappiness. It follows that the second part then talks about the various causes of happiness, with the end goal of the author being able to devise a framework to conquer happiness.

Every chapter deals with a particular area that contributes to the unhappiness or happiness in a human being. The author proceeds to dissect that cause and provide his approach of dealing with that cause. For example, the causes on unhappiness include Competition, Boredom, Persecution Mania, and a fear of public opinion. These are emotions that every human faces to some degree or the other. In the more grounded of us, these emotions are in control, whereas others still face a much more uphill battle in dealing with these emotions in daily life.

The causes of happiness, in the view of the author, include zest, family, work, and effort. Again, looking at this list, one would not be mistaken to imagine himself reading a self-help book. Yet, I would still recommend reading this book in its entirety due to its timeless ideas. Of course, some of the content is not politically correct in today’s day and age. But you have to forgive the author for using terms and meaning that were more relevant and acceptable at the time that this book was written.

At the end of the book, the author presents his overview of what constitutes a happy man. In short, what I gleaned from the book were the following steps to ensure that unhappiness does not take over your life:-

  1. Focus on outward pursuits not inward. Unhappy people often focus on the wrongs that happen to them. Instead of focusing on the outward world, they interpret the events in their life negatively because of their unhappiness. The author says that one must focus outward in order to reduce the events that affect you negatively.
  2. Cultivate more number of interests in varied fields – According to the author, having a narrow focus or having only one thing (other than work) to focus on can also be overwhelming sometimes. Instead by cultivating a varied set of hobbies can help one fight the devilish habit of boredom, and help one spend time more happily.
  3. Stop comparing yourself to others
  4. Give happiness to others instead of asking it. Paradoxically, this gives you back much more happiness.

“The happy man is the man who lives objectively, who has free affections and wide interests, who secures his happiness through these interests and affections and through the fact that they, in turn, make him an object of interest and affection to many others. To be the recipient of affection is a potent cause of happiness, but the man who demands affection is not the man upon whom it is bestowed. The man who receives affection is, speaking broadly, the man who gives it.”

This book is a very good introduction to Bertrand Russell’s other famous works and can be considered as a starting point in your journey. The overly obvious self-help tones may be jarring to some, but the advice is still relevant and quite helpful.

Verdict: Recommended if you’re planning to start out to read more about Western Philosophy. 3.75 out of 5.

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