Atomic Habits by James Clear – Book Review

Sometimes, but rarely, in your book reading journey comes a book that impacts you so much, that you can’t wait to end the book just so that you can write a review of the book. At times the book is so brilliant that you want to praise it profusely, or sometimes it is so horribly bad that you want to get done with it and close the chapter forever, and leave a scathing review for wasting your time. This book, Atomic Habits by James Clear, is clearly one of the former.

Although this is by no means the first book written on the psychology or science of habits, I have a feeling that it will become a very important one in the future. I’ll come to why. But first let me talk about the first book that was actually written, or at least the first book that broke down habits, and how they can be made or unmade, widely known to the general public. It was the book The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg. I have read that book a couple of years back and while it was a groundbreaking book, it didn’t do much for me. Somehow I felt I didn’t connect with the book. For some reason I felt that The Power of Habit belonged more in the Psychology/Reference section instead of Self-Help.

That is why I loved Atomic Habits. For someone looking to get an idea of why they have certain habits or how they can change their habits, this book would be a much more effective recommendation. Because it explains the science as well as sets out clear, concise and actionable steps to achieve the change that you’re looking for. The book had so many aahaa moments that I couldn’t stop recommending it to everyone around me. Frankly speaking, it took me my entire willpower to stop a stranger on the street and exhort him to read this book ASAP. Well maybe, that is what I am doing just now, not on the street but on the Internet!

From one of the author’s own interviews, this is what a reader had to say about the book. “[Atomic Habits] seems a LOT more practical and focused on guiding people on how to actually make changes. Power of Habit is more journalistic, though it does have the appendix at the back that talks about how to implement habit changes.”

According to the author, there are four laws that can be used to create good habits or to break bad ones. The book follows the same structure. It starts with talking about the importance of making small changes in your routine to improve yourself. There is a well repeated statistic on how a 1% improvement every day can bring compounded changes over a long period of time. It then introduces the habit feedback loop where each habit follows the cue -> craving -> response -> reward cycle.

Each law focuses on one of these four aspects. The crux of the book is that a habit can be changed by targeting one (or more) of these steps. The beauty of the book (and the feedback loop) is that this concept itself is complete. If you can understand this concept thoroughly, you’ve read enough of the book. You don’t need to read further. But of course I would still recommend you to completely read the book. Because it is that good. There are many sections that will resonate with you, especially if you have tried earlier to create habits and have struggled to follow through on them. The language used by the author is clear, practical, and not exceedingly anecdotal.

By the time I reached the 2nd law, I was ready to start habit stacking, temptation bundling and all the other cool-sounding (and effective) keywords that are used to describe a particular strategy. I feel sheepish to say that for the longest time that this book felt like a template self-help genre book that was high on fluff and low on content. This was my perception before having opened the book and even reading a single page of it. In fact I actively avoided reading it for as long as I could. But given the time of the year, when new year resolutions are being prepared, this felt like a suitable read. And boy am I glad I picked this book up. I’m pretty sure that by using the concepts in this book you can create resolutions that you can stick to till the end of the year, instead of seeing them evaporate by mid March.

I can’t wait to finish this book, and then go through all my highlights and notes to prepare a one pager. A cheat sheet if you will (Update: What do you know? There’s a cheat sheet already available at the end of the book!) This is a book that I will be rereading multiple times. Atomic HABITS is in my books, a clear winner and an addiction killer. Go read it before you create your new year resolutions for 2019.

Update: I did finish this book well in time for the new year and am ready to make my habit checklist. At the end of the book, there is a section that I found really strange. The author has given a few additional tips and techniques for people further wishing to explore the subject of effective habit creation. These tips, although useful and interesting, feel disjointed and feel out of place in this excellent book. Nevertheless you can choose to read it or ignore. Either way it won’t hurt you.

Star rating – 5/5
What next can you read – The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg, Nudge by Richard Thaler.