The Geometry of Wealth by Brian Portnoy – Book Review

Was I reading the right book?

When you have a “How to” in the title of your book, one expects that it is a more of a practical guide to whatever you are ‘HowTo’ing. And it is that expectation that led me to explore this book. The book is almost a year old but there only were a handful of reviews on Amazon. Also, 91% of them were 5-stars. But more of that later.

You will be sorely disappointed if you also expect this to be a self-help or an investing guide as its title unbashedly markets the book. This is more of a long-winded and tangential exploration of how wealth can affect happiness and human behaviour. I still gave the book a honest chance to understand the arguments the author was making.

The author starts off by dividing the book into three parts – each a logical step in planning and building wealth. Once this clear and useful definition is set up, the author goes on a detour. Somewhere in the woods for finding happiness, he takes us on a wild goose chase before coming back to the point he was earlier making. At one point in time, I had to go back to GoodReads to figure out whether I was reading the right book or whether there was a glitch in the Amazon system that got me the wrong book.

Leaning heavily on other behavioural finance references, notably Kahneman, the author explains how he melded works from different authors and derived his own understanding of the effect of money on happiness. As one of the other reviews of this book on goodreads says, any one who is remotely interested in behavioural psychology/finance would have read about Kahneman, Tversky or Thaler. Knowing that this book doesn’t bring any thing new to the table, it would indeed be redundant to read this, especially with the side quests that the author often participates in.

When the book takes almost half of the content to come to the point, I feel I would be doing the right thing in skimming the book instead of reading it thoroughly. And if you’re really interested in completing the book, that is what I would recommend. Otherwise, the psychology of building wealth can be better understood through other well known works.

Here’s my take on how happiness is linked with wealth. Yes, wealth can bring a certain level of happiness. But as is with any other thing in life, the marginal utility of wealth decreases as we have more and more of it. It should not be used as an end to itself, but as a means to achieving your true purpose in life, whatever you define that to be. Money may or may not directly give you happiness. But one thing I know for sure is that this book did not give me happiness at all. The proof of the geometry of wealth stays unsolved for me