What to do when you’re having two by Natalie Diaz

There are loads of books that help one guide through the uncertain, and often scary, nine months of pregnancy. However most of these books are focused on a single child pregnancy. For couples having a multiple pregnancy, i.e. twins, triplets or more(!), these nine months can be a harrowing period. Not only does one have to take additional care during these months of pregnancy, but life gets more chaotic after the angels are born. Mothers who have gone through the chaos that can accompany the first few months of a birth can attest to the fact that having twins can effectively stretch you even further for your time, money and effort in ensuring a smooth pregnancy and having healthy babies.

Thankfully there is a growing collection of books and other material targeted specifically for women with two or more buns in the oven. What to do when you’re having two is one such book written by a mother of twins who has gone through this experience first-hand. The author is also the founder of Twiniversity, an online forum filled with resources for people interested in learning more about a twin pregnancy and how to go about it while still being level-headed.

The book is short and easy to read. Consisting of twelve chapters, each part of the book deals with a different area that would-be parents are likely to scratch their head about. Right from the initial shock of knowing that there are two babies (or more) on the way, to questions about affording to raise them, this book tackles it all. Not only does it talk about the pregnancy, but it also describes the initial months after delivery that are bound to be most chaotic, especially in a twin delivery. As it should be, the author does not shy away from including the bad with the good and makes her point clear on how a twin pregnancy can potentially have higher risks than a singleton pregnancy.

What I liked about the book is that there is loads of actionable advice that will help calm the nerves of couple with a twin pregnancy. Especially if you live in the “western world”, the author reveals loads of ways that you can utilise to reduce the financial burden on raising more than one child simultaneously. I, for one, did not realise there are special support groups in bigger cities that are targeted at helping women with twin pregnancies cope with the emotional upheaval during such a time. There was even a section on how a C-section and a vaginal delivery takes place. This would be quite enlightening for first time parents.

The author also gives impeccable advice regarding the first few days after delivery, of observing the nurses and other hospital staff on how they handle your baby, in order to learn the right way to do it once you’re home and without any expert help around all the time. Yes, once you reach home, you will have only your spouse, family and friends to help you get through the initial amorphous mess that will be now your life for a few months. The author also discusses a few points on dealing with your children’s sleeping and eating patterns and keeping your sanity intact while doing so.

On the flip side, I felt that the book did not give sufficient focus on the pregnancy itself. Except for a couple of chapters, the book focused on similar tips and techniques that would be valid for a single pregnancy as well. This delicate phase of carrying two babies in your womb and how to ensure a healthy complication-free pregnancy could have been explained in more detail.

This book definitely should not be the only book that you read about bringing your child in this world. There are other books out there that are more detailed and useful in that aspect. But this book does give a good overview of what to expect when you’re expecting twice. Combine this book with other books that are well known and researched so that you’re fully prepared as you move towards this exciting phase in your life.

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Throw me to the wolves by Patrick McGuinness

This was a reddit recommendation and a much needed change of genre after ploughing through quite a few avoidable books in the non-fiction genre. I wanted to read a mystery/crime/thriller but wanted to steer clear of the unreliable narrator trope that is currently the in-thing in these categories of novels. A reddit user recommended this book and after reading the synopsis I felt hooked on to it.

Throw me to the Wolves is a novel about a crime, an investigation, and a suspect. The focus is on the police investigation and the back story of the suspect. Patrick Guinness interweaves these two main timelines along with side characters and a memorable inclusion of the incidents related to the sewer system of England in the 2010s. The author deftly moves in between these different events and paints an initial cynical portrait of a police office and his partner as they race against the red-tops and other morally questionable news outlets to solve the murder of Zalie Dyer.

The author is quite observant and has a witty style of writing. The prose is beautiful and a joy to read. At times though, I felt that the author did go overboard with the similes and metaphors but there is nothing jarring about his usage. Mr Wolphram, the prime suspect, has the choicest of dialogue, and his measured and precise replies to his interrogators paint an intelligent and confident persona of him that is a delight to meet.

All times are specific, Officer, it’s people who are not.

What I didn’t like about the book was that the plot seems to go nowhere almost till halfway through the book. The author seems to focus on the school events – that forms the backstory of the suspect – more than the investigation. Although this timeline plays somewhat of a minor role towards the end, it feels like a needlessly long drawn out narrative just to prove a single point. Towards the end of the book, the investigation suddenly picks up speed until the detectives solve the mystery almost within a few minutes. This jolt felt quite unrealistic and jarring from the meandering pace that the rest of the book follows.

But again, McGuinness writes a beautiful story. The chemistry between the lead pair of detective brings to mind a likeness to recent pop culture. It was like watching a season of True Detective. The description of the school and its students feels straight out of the iconic Another Brick in the Wall song by the inimitable Pink Floyd. Although debatable, this song also showcases the ugly side of the authoritative school system of Britain back in the days. The Trial is one of the most haunting chapters to read and would bring forth dark memories of school for many readers. Readers be warned.

The pain he inflicts has footnotes. The snap of the torturer’s glove is as pleasurable to a certain kind of person as the pain it presages, and the Doc is that kind of person.

Throw Me to the Wolves is a must read if you’re a fan of the police procedure sub-genre. But whether you’re a fan of the crime genre or not, I would recommend it for the beautiful observatory and on-point prose by the author.

Featured Photo Credit: Benjamin Davies
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