New Erotica for Feminists Book Review

The title of the book itself screams that this book is not going to be like any other book published before. Erotica? We got millions of books on that. Feminism? Yes that is a hot and burning topic today. But erotica for feminists? Librarians are going to have a hard time deciding which shelf this book goes on. At first the witty title piques my curiosity but then the blurb takes over,

He calls me into his office and closes the door . . . to promote me. He promotes me again and again. I am wild with ecstasy.

When you’re chuckling even before you open a book, that book surely deserves a read. And this book did deserve the same.

I picked this book up for a lighter read while I attempt to plow through a mammoth book that I have taken up as my first 2019 read. That other book is Daniel Yergin’s Pulitzer prize winning history of oil, The Prize. It is such a detailed and lengthy book that I have to take regular breaks in order to keep my sanity. The scope of the book and the number of characters, if not protagonists, is overwhelming. But I’ll complete it in a few weeks.

So back to the topic of erotica. The last I remember reading erotica is a teenager, with raging hormones and an utter need to pick up anything related to sex. Much water has flown under the bridge since then. The hormones have mellowed and the genre is no longer a surreptitious pleasure for me anymore. But the reason I picked up this book is that it belongs to a newly invented genre. As they say, invention is simply taking existing things and combining them in different ways to create something new. Take erotica, of which there is enough literature (most of it bad), take feminism, which is quite relevant in today’s times, and combine the two, and poof. You have a brand new genre that is completely unique and if tackled correctly, can be quite enjoyable and instructive as well.

Four authors have attempted the same in this book. The founders of the comedy/satire website, Belladonna  are the authors of this quirky book. The idea came out of a series of group chats that the authors developed and structured into a book. The authors were particularly frustrated by the lack of reach of feminism in many spheres of life even today. The outcome is a series of short montages of erotica that completely overturn the story and its ending. It’s like having an M Night Shyamalan twist in every montage.

I was initially confused as I was expecting a few stories that ran across pages. Instead when each page started with a new setting, I was left turning pages back and forth at first. A few episodes down the line I realized (and appreciated) that the goal of the authors was to cover many situations as possible, and so crisp and terse montages were the way to go. And they do work. Just when the reader expects a certain punchline or the mini-plot to go one way, the feminist twist to the story takes it off to an unexpected direction. I would not be honest if I said that I could predict the punch-line in every story. A part of me was disappointed by the sudden break in the sensuous build-up, but a part of me smiled as well. Yes, women do face discrimination in this world, and this book showcases that in a subtle, yet thoughtful manner.

I never thought that one day I would analyze erotica (and it is difficult to call this erotica, because nothing erotic happens in the end). But nevertheless this book is a fresh and unique way to tackle a sensitive subject. It is designed to bring out the “oh, I didn’t know men did that”, and I’m sure there will be certain montages where the male readers of this book may realize that, “hmm, maybe this is how it feels”. If this book evokes such realizations from the reading public, I’m sure it will have achieved its purpose to a very large extent. The authors pretty much say the same thing at the end of the book,

“We just used an entire book of comedy to point out some ways in which women are expected to lived up to society’s impossible and often conflicting standards.”

Satire is meant to bring out the inadequacies, the flaws, of a certain topic without making it into a rant. If done correctly, it is a brilliant tool and an enduring one. If not, it falls flat on its face and loses its purpose. This book uses satire to take on a very important concept of gender equality and does a pretty good job of it. Pick this book up if you’re curious about how women face sexism in day to day situations, and how they wish the world would instead behave.

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