Never Grow Up by Jackie Chan – Book Review

6 min read

What can you say about Jackie Chan? He’s not only a great martial artist and a movie maker, but also a very good human being. You just can’t not love the man and his antics on screen. A veteran of over 200 movies with an equally impressive number of broken bones in his body, Jackie Chan has transcended language, political and cultural barriers to become one of the most recognised movie stars in the world today. In his own words, he is well known in the remote jungles of Africa as well as isolated islands in the Pacific Ocean (Vanuatu).

But I have a very strong feeling that not much would be known of the man outside the movie. One thing is well known, that he has been injured a lot, judging from the bloopers that he places at the end of his every movie. Some of this injuries have been life threatening. So it is only natural that one would be curious to understand what drives Jackie Chan to place his body under such extreme stress just in order to get that perfect stunt. This book promises to reveal that and much more.

The way to never grow up is to love what you do. I love movies. Making them keeps me young at heart. Most of the time, I forget how old I am!

Although the Chinese version of the book was released way back in 2015, it is only now that the English version is out. And just like the man and his movies, this book is a likeable memoir, honest, unflinching and entertaining. The book starts with his early years in Hong Kong, his initial schooling and his “dark decade” in the famous China Drama Academy (CDA). It was during this decade that his parents had moved to Australia leaving him at the mercy of the infamous Master Yu Jim-Yuen, who ran the CDA. According to Jackie Chan, his parents signed him off for ten years to study and stay at the boarding school. And so the foundation of the man who was to become a world famous martial artist was laid in this school. Luckily, because the school focused on drama, opera and fighting rather than the traditional academic subjects, Jackie Chan found a natural outlet towards the world of movies and acting.

The book traces his initial struggling days as a stunt extra along side other greats, notably Bruce Lee. He was an extra in the blockbuster Enter the Dragon, with a screen time of less than ten seconds. But his intensity and passion towards performing dangerous and risky stunts ensured that people kept in mind his young reckless kid who was good at combining action with comedy, leading to a whole new genre of movies.

The book describes his initial break as a lead actor and his swift rise to become a superstar, first in China and then across the world. Jackie Chan wistfully remembers his godfathers who gave him that break and a free hand in creating action sequences the way he liked them to be.

Jackie Chan also writes about his marriage and his child. This is where the pain is evident. Jackie makes it obvious that he has neglected his family for long, especially his son. From the chapters on his family, it made me feel that there is still an unspoken tension between Jackie Chan and his son. The imperfect portrait of a star who has “more dollars than sense” is kind of heart-breaking. According to the book, Jackie Chan does not know how to read and write. But then after his unbelievable success as an international movie star he hasn’t felt the need to.

…I do regret not learning to read and write or do math. When I grew up and went to America to make movies, everyone was using credit cards, but I couldn’t possibly. At the time, you had to fill out a credit card slip to pay for things, and I didn’t know how to write. Every time I signed my name, it looked different. Store clerks would compare the signature on the slip with the one on the card and didn’t believe they matched…Currently, I have an unlimited black card in my wallet and could buy a jet plane with it. It’s blank without a signature.

But I did feel that underneath the friendly nature and the ever-smiling face, there is a semi-dark egotistical human being. His extravagant shopping sprees and his seemingly childish revenges (on the sales girl who ignored him when he wasn’t well off, and his friend who swindled him of 3million dollars) are just two examples. But does that reduce me love for Jackie Chan? Not a bit. Maybe it is a cultural thing and I’m definitely not the right person to judge him for his flaws.

And what introspection of Jackie Chan would be complete without his jaw-dropping stunts, both for the audience and for him? He mentions in the book that there is probably not a single place in his body that hasn’t been wounded during the action sequences of his movies. One of the ugliest ones was his jump onto a tree in Armour of God, where effectively fractured his skull with blood gushing out of his ears and nose. Today at the age of 63, he keeps on making movies and entertaining people through his antics. But deep within, he probably knows that he has abused his body more than he should have.

My ankle joint pops out of its socket all the time, even when I’m just walking around, and I’ll have to pop it back in. My leg sometimes gets dislocated when I’m showering. For that one, I need my assistant to help me click it back in.

It is evident that through his journey, initially in the Chinese film industry and then in Hollywood, Jackie Chan has learnt a lot. It is this learning attitude that the book brings out nicely. At the end of the book the veteran Jackie Chan has two pointed appeals. One to the Chinese film industry to keep on learning from the West, and incorporating the best film making techniques into the beautiful tales from the East. The second appeal is for the national treasures of countries to be restored safely into the country of origin, helping preserve the ancient culture and dignity of those relics. Apparently, his movie Chinese Zodiac was an effort towards the same, and it did result in the return of some of such Chinese relics.

The book is peppered with classic Chinese philosophy, right from the way the Chinese prefer to raise their children, to their approaches to work and life. And it is clear that Jackie Chan does not want to be seen as the perfect movie star, husband or father, and he makes it evident that he learnt as he grew old.

I liked the memoir for its honest outlook about a flawed yet likeable human being. After all, who among us is perfect? Pick this book up to find out what lies beyond the two hours of carefully edited screen time of a movie, the pain and the passion that goes into making a Jackie Chan masterpiece.

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