Atomic Habits by James Clear – Book Review

Sometimes, but rarely, in your book reading journey comes a book that impacts you so much, that you can’t wait to end the book just so that you can write a review of the book. At times the book is so brilliant that you want to praise it profusely, or sometimes it is so horribly bad that you want to get done with it and close the chapter forever, and leave a scathing review for wasting your time. This book, Atomic Habits by James Clear, is clearly one of the former.

Although this is by no means the first book written on the psychology or science of habits, I have a feeling that it will become a very important one in the future. I’ll come to why. But first let me talk about the first book that was actually written, or at least the first book that broke down habits, and how they can be made or unmade, widely known to the general public. It was the book The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg. I have read that book a couple of years back and while it was a groundbreaking book, it didn’t do much for me. Somehow I felt I didn’t connect with the book. For some reason I felt that The Power of Habit belonged more in the Psychology/Reference section instead of Self-Help.

That is why I loved Atomic Habits. For someone looking to get an idea of why they have certain habits or how they can change their habits, this book would be a much more effective recommendation. Because it explains the science as well as sets out clear, concise and actionable steps to achieve the change that you’re looking for. The book had so many aahaa moments that I couldn’t stop recommending it to everyone around me. Frankly speaking, it took me my entire willpower to stop a stranger on the street and exhort him to read this book ASAP. Well maybe, that is what I am doing just now, not on the street but on the Internet!

From one of the author’s own interviews, this is what a reader had to say about the book. “[Atomic Habits] seems a LOT more practical and focused on guiding people on how to actually make changes. Power of Habit is more journalistic, though it does have the appendix at the back that talks about how to implement habit changes.”

According to the author, there are four laws that can be used to create good habits or to break bad ones. The book follows the same structure. It starts with talking about the importance of making small changes in your routine to improve yourself. There is a well repeated statistic on how a 1% improvement every day can bring compounded changes over a long period of time. It then introduces the habit feedback loop where each habit follows the cue -> craving -> response -> reward cycle.

Each law focuses on one of these four aspects. The crux of the book is that a habit can be changed by targeting one (or more) of these steps. The beauty of the book (and the feedback loop) is that this concept itself is complete. If you can understand this concept thoroughly, you’ve read enough of the book. You don’t need to read further. But of course I would still recommend you to completely read the book. Because it is that good. There are many sections that will resonate with you, especially if you have tried earlier to create habits and have struggled to follow through on them. The language used by the author is clear, practical, and not exceedingly anecdotal.

By the time I reached the 2nd law, I was ready to start habit stacking, temptation bundling and all the other cool-sounding (and effective) keywords that are used to describe a particular strategy. I feel sheepish to say that for the longest time that this book felt like a template self-help genre book that was high on fluff and low on content. This was my perception before having opened the book and even reading a single page of it. In fact I actively avoided reading it for as long as I could. But given the time of the year, when new year resolutions are being prepared, this felt like a suitable read. And boy am I glad I picked this book up. I’m pretty sure that by using the concepts in this book you can create resolutions that you can stick to till the end of the year, instead of seeing them evaporate by mid March.

I can’t wait to finish this book, and then go through all my highlights and notes to prepare a one pager. A cheat sheet if you will (Update: What do you know? There’s a cheat sheet already available at the end of the book!) This is a book that I will be rereading multiple times. Atomic HABITS is in my books, a clear winner and an addiction killer. Go read it before you create your new year resolutions for 2019.

Update: I did finish this book well in time for the new year and am ready to make my habit checklist. At the end of the book, there is a section that I found really strange. The author has given a few additional tips and techniques for people further wishing to explore the subject of effective habit creation. These tips, although useful and interesting, feel disjointed and feel out of place in this excellent book. Nevertheless you can choose to read it or ignore. Either way it won’t hurt you.

Star rating – 5/5
What next can you read – The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg, Nudge by Richard Thaler.

Never Grow Up by Jackie Chan – Book Review

What can you say about Jackie Chan? He’s not only a great martial artist and a movie maker, but also a very good human being. You just can’t not love the man and his antics on screen. A veteran of over 200 movies with an equally impressive number of broken bones in his body, Jackie Chan has transcended language, political and cultural barriers to become one of the most recognised movie stars in the world today. In his own words, he is well known in the remote jungles of Africa as well as isolated islands in the Pacific Ocean (Vanuatu).

But I have a very strong feeling that not much would be known of the man outside the movie. One thing is well known, that he has been injured a lot, judging from the bloopers that he places at the end of his every movie. Some of this injuries have been life threatening. So it is only natural that one would be curious to understand what drives Jackie Chan to place his body under such extreme stress just in order to get that perfect stunt. This book promises to reveal that and much more.

The way to never grow up is to love what you do. I love movies. Making them keeps me young at heart. Most of the time, I forget how old I am!

Although the Chinese version of the book was released way back in 2015, it is only now that the English version is out. And just like the man and his movies, this book is a likeable memoir, honest, unflinching and entertaining. The book starts with his early years in Hong Kong, his initial schooling and his “dark decade” in the famous China Drama Academy (CDA). It was during this decade that his parents had moved to Australia leaving him at the mercy of the infamous Master Yu Jim-Yuen, who ran the CDA. According to Jackie Chan, his parents signed him off for ten years to study and stay at the boarding school. And so the foundation of the man who was to become a world famous martial artist was laid in this school. Luckily, because the school focused on drama, opera and fighting rather than the traditional academic subjects, Jackie Chan found a natural outlet towards the world of movies and acting.

The book traces his initial struggling days as a stunt extra along side other greats, notably Bruce Lee. He was an extra in the blockbuster Enter the Dragon, with a screen time of less than ten seconds. But his intensity and passion towards performing dangerous and risky stunts ensured that people kept in mind his young reckless kid who was good at combining action with comedy, leading to a whole new genre of movies.

The book describes his initial break as a lead actor and his swift rise to become a superstar, first in China and then across the world. Jackie Chan wistfully remembers his godfathers who gave him that break and a free hand in creating action sequences the way he liked them to be.

Jackie Chan also writes about his marriage and his child. This is where the pain is evident. Jackie makes it obvious that he has neglected his family for long, especially his son. From the chapters on his family, it made me feel that there is still an unspoken tension between Jackie Chan and his son. The imperfect portrait of a star who has “more dollars than sense” is kind of heart-breaking. According to the book, Jackie Chan does not know how to read and write. But then after his unbelievable success as an international movie star he hasn’t felt the need to.

…I do regret not learning to read and write or do math. When I grew up and went to America to make movies, everyone was using credit cards, but I couldn’t possibly. At the time, you had to fill out a credit card slip to pay for things, and I didn’t know how to write. Every time I signed my name, it looked different. Store clerks would compare the signature on the slip with the one on the card and didn’t believe they matched…Currently, I have an unlimited black card in my wallet and could buy a jet plane with it. It’s blank without a signature.

But I did feel that underneath the friendly nature and the ever-smiling face, there is a semi-dark egotistical human being. His extravagant shopping sprees and his seemingly childish revenges (on the sales girl who ignored him when he wasn’t well off, and his friend who swindled him of 3million dollars) are just two examples. But does that reduce me love for Jackie Chan? Not a bit. Maybe it is a cultural thing and I’m definitely not the right person to judge him for his flaws.

And what introspection of Jackie Chan would be complete without his jaw-dropping stunts, both for the audience and for him? He mentions in the book that there is probably not a single place in his body that hasn’t been wounded during the action sequences of his movies. One of the ugliest ones was his jump onto a tree in Armour of God, where effectively fractured his skull with blood gushing out of his ears and nose. Today at the age of 63, he keeps on making movies and entertaining people through his antics. But deep within, he probably knows that he has abused his body more than he should have.

My ankle joint pops out of its socket all the time, even when I’m just walking around, and I’ll have to pop it back in. My leg sometimes gets dislocated when I’m showering. For that one, I need my assistant to help me click it back in.

It is evident that through his journey, initially in the Chinese film industry and then in Hollywood, Jackie Chan has learnt a lot. It is this learning attitude that the book brings out nicely. At the end of the book the veteran Jackie Chan has two pointed appeals. One to the Chinese film industry to keep on learning from the West, and incorporating the best film making techniques into the beautiful tales from the East. The second appeal is for the national treasures of countries to be restored safely into the country of origin, helping preserve the ancient culture and dignity of those relics. Apparently, his movie Chinese Zodiac was an effort towards the same, and it did result in the return of some of such Chinese relics.

The book is peppered with classic Chinese philosophy, right from the way the Chinese prefer to raise their children, to their approaches to work and life. And it is clear that Jackie Chan does not want to be seen as the perfect movie star, husband or father, and he makes it evident that he learnt as he grew old.

I liked the memoir for its honest outlook about a flawed yet likeable human being. After all, who among us is perfect? Pick this book up to find out what lies beyond the two hours of carefully edited screen time of a movie, the pain and the passion that goes into making a Jackie Chan masterpiece.

The Laws of Human Nature – Book Review

I’ve enjoyed Robert Greene’s previous books immensely. The 48 Laws of Power was my introduction to the Machiavellian world of power and intrigue. Each page of the book was filled with useful ways to create an aura of power and become a more powerful social creature. His later book, Mastery focused more on an improvement of the self. In that book Greene explored the ways one can learn from the various Masters who have lived before us and have made a profound impact in various areas. And it was with this same interest and hope that I approached this book.

Just like his other books, this one is massive as well. Going for a never-ending 624 pages, it is by no means a quick read. And after reading through a few chapters, I realized that the book has fallen prey to the oft tried and tested trend in self-help literature. Anecdotes, anecdotes and more anecdotes. Mind you this is a safe method. That is why most self help literature heavily rely on this structure. But it is something that I greatly abhor. Yes successful stories do strengthen the conviction of a particular theory. But they also tend to suffer from confirmation and selection bias. It is almost as if Greene made a rough outline of the laws and then searched for examples that would fit these theories. Moreover it feels like that some of the anecdotes are greatly simplified or even modified to suit the narrative.

He might have done the same in his other books as well. But for some reason these anecdotes don’t work here. After a couple of chapters, I found myself skipping the anecdotes directly to the part where he explained a particular law.

Me, every five minutes

But by the time I reached the fifth law, I found it quite impossible to carry on. And hence I closed the book, abandoning it for good. I very much would have wanted to like this book and learn from it. But unfortunately the denseness of the material really put me off. The author has rambled on and on to fill up the book with feel-good stories and then propose a one-page full fount of self-help advice. I feel a better idea would be to go through the bibliography that the author has given at the end and instead peruse some of those works. That would be a more productive use of your time.

The Solution To Social Anxiety by Dr Aziz Gazipura

I have always identified to some firm of shyness or social anxiety disorder (SAD) since I was a kid. I hated going to events, parties, gatherings – basically any place where there will be lots of humans. And Earth is full of them. That puts me shit out of luck. I dreaded meeting not only strangers but even people I knew. As long as the number of people were large, I shied away from it.
So it was a no-brainer for me to pick this book up. I have read books on shyness/SAD before but the thing about such books (and the self-help genre in general) is that many of them are filled with anecdotal fluff, or pointless exercises in a workbook style. And AFAIK I don’t recall finishing any book on this topic that was substantial in content.
However I’m glad that I gave this book a chance. What I immediately liked about the book was that unlike most self-help books it is not full of fluff. The author has not chosen to fill the book with random stories or pointless exercises. And for that I’m thankful. The book is a quick read and for its compact size (only 230 pages), packs in quite a punch.
The book is divided into two parts. The first part talks about the problem – the causes of social anxiety and how people with SAD tend to think and behave. The second part, obviously, is about the solution to social anxiety. The book quickly jumps into the major causes of why a person with social anxiety feels that he is not up to the mark of his peers. Many a times, the overhang of having an ugly experience in the past overshadows the present day situations. People with SAD have a very strong and ruthless self-critic that berates every endeavor by the individual in connecting with others. Hence shy people tend to reject their self worth even before (if ever) other people do so. As they say, you miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.
The second part of the book starts with explaining what people with social confidence do instead. It is not that people who are confident do not have thoughts of inability or in-adequateness rise in their minds. They do as well. However, they do not let such thoughts overwhelm their actions.
Effectively, it is a case of feeling the fear and doing it anyway. The author talks about a set of clear and effective steps to overcome this fear as and when it is happening. Being aware (or mindful) of one thoughts is one way that the author suggests this can be done. But first one needs to accept oneself even before making any such effort. The book also mentions that shy people have a fear of being vulnerable and that they prevent themselves from getting hurt by avoiding such situations. However, the author believes that such people need to put themselves in such situations and consciously think and behave differently than their automatic patterns of thought have done till now.
All in all the book does a very good job of mapping out the most common causes of social anxiety and the steps one can take gradually to decrease or reduce the feeling of shyness. Reading this book made me realize that there is no rocket science to this. Plain old common sense and getting out of your comfort zone. Although this book by itself may not be as powerful as some others (read the recommendations given at the end) I still feel that it is quite a useful book because of its compact message and its useful suggestions.
This book gets a 5 out of 5 for not succumbing to the temptation that most self help books fall into. Read it as a starting point for your journey towards becoming more socially confident.

The Behavioral Investor by Daniel Crosby – Book Review

Mention the word behavioural pscyhology and a few well-known names come to mind. Kahneman, Baumeister, Thaler, and to a certain extent, Taleb are just a few examples. So it was a bit surprising when I came across a book by a relatively unknown author. But given that investing is a passion, and books are my weakness, I had to read this book. Continue reading “The Behavioral Investor by Daniel Crosby – Book Review”